Compression jamb liners- bad?

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Shims
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Compression jamb liners- bad?

#1 Post by Shims » Sat Aug 14, 2010 11:56 am

Are compression type PVC jamb liners bad? I've seen a lot in 90s houses with wood windows that don't compress as well and have developed air gaps. They have the foam backing. What are the best type of jamb liners?

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Windows on Washington
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Re: Compression jamb liners- bad?

#2 Post by Windows on Washington » Sat Aug 14, 2010 3:47 pm

Window systems that rely on a "memory foam" will have to have that foam replaced at some point in the window's lifespan. Being that it is behind the jamb liner, this makes this an inanely difficult process.

toddinmn
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Re: Compression jamb liners- bad?

#3 Post by toddinmn » Sun Aug 15, 2010 12:12 am

Are looking to replace some jambliners in existing windows or buy some new windows that utilize jambliners?Most of the jambliners come out very easy and without tools.Finding the correct replacement foam may be inanely difficult, so you may want to just replace the tracks at this time.

TheWindowNerd
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Re: Compression jamb liners- bad?

#4 Post by TheWindowNerd » Sun Aug 15, 2010 5:46 am

I have found that paint is more of a problem with compression jamb liners, some onepaints and caulks the jamb liner edge and the flex is gone.
Also sill rot behind the jamb liner is common.

toddinmn
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Re: Compression jamb liners- bad?

#5 Post by toddinmn » Sun Aug 15, 2010 9:45 am

I to have seen many people paint there jambliners but never had seen any rot.
I am usually always dealing with sashs kits and not newer windows from the 90's though. We always flash the wells and blindstops in aluminum.I would not use a jambliner system without a storm window.

JScott
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Re: Compression jamb liners- bad?

#6 Post by JScott » Sun Aug 15, 2010 12:25 pm

Bad...

No.

Outdated...yes. 1970 technology.

We have developed a method of installing 5/8" backer rod behind the jamb from the interior which takes about 10 minutes per window.

Todd indicates a storm window use as well but he is in Minn. The compression liner, being made of plastic, tend to allow air leakage over time as the foam backing looses its rigidity. The Jeld-wen Zap pack uses two ridgit flanges in addition to help the liner be supported. Storms are not required here as a recommendation due to the lower wind ratings than what Todd has. Keep in mind many new windows with compression jambs would benefit as well with storms in a windy area. Structural performance of windows are tested at a rate of approximately a 25 mph wind.

Last trip to Warroad, Minn. I had to put rocks in my pockets to keep from blowing around and in Warsaw, WI. the traffic lights do not hang freely as they do here. They are mounted securely as not to be blowing all over the place.

:mrgreen:

TheWindowNerd
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Re: Compression jamb liners- bad?

#7 Post by TheWindowNerd » Sun Aug 15, 2010 5:00 pm

I quess that is why pella used stainless stell behind there compression jamb liners.

toddinmn
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Re: Compression jamb liners- bad?

#8 Post by toddinmn » Mon Aug 16, 2010 9:13 pm

JScott, You have my interest on your backer rod mod,Could you share any details or is this propietary information?

JScott
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Re: Compression jamb liners- bad?

#9 Post by JScott » Tue Aug 17, 2010 3:44 pm

Todd,

WOW and Buddy know how to contact me. I will hook you with our field service manager and he will explain the procedure.

8)

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