Replacing louvre windows with vinyl

Do it yourself Questions - If Your Bound & Determined
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Fredseviltwin
Posts: 1
Joined: Wed Sep 20, 2017 8:48 am
Location: Kent,WA

Replacing louvre windows with vinyl

#1 Post by Fredseviltwin » Wed Sep 20, 2017 10:57 am

This is my first post on this forum. I'm needing advice for this project. I hope this is pretty straightforward. I have louvre windows. Crazy here in western Washington, right? These louvre windows are Stainless steel sections and are frameless each side only screwed into the sides of wood framed openings. Removing them will be quick I Measuring openings will be next.
My questions are:
1. After measuring the actual opening, including if actually square openings. How much smaller should the new frames be than the actual openings? I was thinking 1/2" smaller than actual opening size. If out of square that clearance would need to be considered.
2. The sill slopes down at 10 degrees. I know there will be an increaseing gap there that I would fill with a foam backer rod. I would cover all the gaps with a wood trim and caulk.
3. I was thinking about a double hung window. Any issues with these?
Several of the existing windows were replaced by the previous owner. These were in white vinyl, I plan to do these replacement windows in the same material. Comfort Design is less than 30 miles away so I would like to buy from them. I don't know if they sell direct.
Any advice would be appreciated.

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HomeSealed
Posts: 2254
Joined: Mon Feb 15, 2010 3:46 pm
Location: Milwaukee & Madison area

Re: Replacing louvre windows with vinyl

#2 Post by HomeSealed » Wed Sep 20, 2017 5:42 pm

Personally I find that 3/8 on width and 1/2" on height is a nice spot to allow for most issues of being out of square, while offering good coverage with existing interior stops. You may need to install new interior stops regardless, so going 1/2" in both h and w should be fine assuming the openings are not rhombus shaped.

As far as the exterior, I'd try to use synthetic materials for any needed stops, and read up/ watch videos on proper drainage plane and flashing details around windows and doors. Familiarize yourself with the concepts so that hopefully you can translate that to your own application.
Good luck on your project!

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