Replacing windows in brick

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Tinfoilman
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Re: Replacing windows in brick

#16 Post by Tinfoilman » Wed Nov 02, 2011 6:28 pm

anthony wrote:The "insert" casement requires no more "flashing than the insert DH. The AW insert DH does not have a fin.
Andersen doesn't make an "insert" casement window that I can find on their website. What they have is "replacement casement windows without installation flanges" and they require new flashing just like any framed window. Their only advantage is making replacement installation faster because you don't have to remove the flange and drill holes thru the frame.

If there is an insert version, I'd love to see it.

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HomeSealed
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Re: Replacing windows in brick

#17 Post by HomeSealed » Wed Nov 02, 2011 7:50 pm

Tinfoilman wrote:
anthony wrote:The "insert" casement requires no more "flashing than the insert DH. The AW insert DH does not have a fin.
Andersen doesn't make an "insert" casement window that I can find on their website. What they have is "replacement casement windows without installation flanges" and they require new flashing just like any framed window. Their only advantage is making replacement installation faster because you don't have to remove the flange and drill holes thru the frame.

If there is an insert version, I'd love to see it.
Tinfoilman, I think that you may be misunderstanding what an "insert" is. It is a window made to fit inside the "pocket" of an existing frame, so that means that the jamb depth is 3 1/4" (as opposed to 4 9/16" or greater), and it does not have a nailing flange. The amount and type of flashing that is necessary depends entirely on your existing window. I don't deal in Andersen so I'm not familiar with their product lines, but by the description, it sounds as if the product mentioned by anthony is in fact made for insert installs for the fact that they refer to it as "replacement". That infers that it meets the criteria that I mentioned above.

Tinfoilman
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Re: Replacing windows in brick

#18 Post by Tinfoilman » Fri Nov 04, 2011 9:42 pm

HomeSealed wrote:
Tinfoilman wrote:
anthony wrote:The "insert" casement requires no more "flashing than the insert DH. The AW insert DH does not have a fin.
Andersen doesn't make an "insert" casement window that I can find on their website. What they have is "replacement casement windows without installation flanges" and they require new flashing just like any framed window. Their only advantage is making replacement installation faster because you don't have to remove the flange and drill holes thru the frame.

If there is an insert version, I'd love to see it.
Tinfoilman, I think that you may be misunderstanding what an "insert" is. It is a window made to fit inside the "pocket" of an existing frame, so that means that the jamb depth is 3 1/4" (as opposed to 4 9/16" or greater), and it does not have a nailing flange. The amount and type of flashing that is necessary depends entirely on your existing window. I don't deal in Andersen so I'm not familiar with their product lines, but by the description, it sounds as if the product mentioned by anthony is in fact made for insert installs for the fact that they refer to it as "replacement". That infers that it meets the criteria that I mentioned above.
Andersen doesn't call the casement an "insert" window for a reason. The "replacement casement" is advertised as coming "fully prepped for quick, easy replacement." Like I said before, it's the same window but without the nailing flange. They also pre-drill the holes through the jambs and provide the screws. So the key word is "prepped," and it's apparent if you read the documentation that it's not a differently designed window like inserts always are.

The installation guide for the replacement casement version is almost the same as the regular version. The main difference is that the replacement shows you how to flash behind different types of exteriors, and of course the fastening differences due to access. With the "insert" double hung you reuse the existing sill and window "pocket", so that you're pretty much only squeezing the new window into the old sash spaces, between the stops. No flashing needed for that. Conversely, the replacement casement won't fit into an existing double hung frame. It sure as heck won't fit between the stops, and new flashing is just about guaranteed.

Or maybe someone can provide a link to a true "insert" casement by Andersen that will fit in an existing double hung frame. I haven't seen one.

TheWindowNerd
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Re: Replacing windows in brick

#19 Post by TheWindowNerd » Sat Nov 05, 2011 7:17 am

It will fit with no jamb extension applied, plus they have a "wide stop option".
You may need to be more careful of the AFS so that the sash will clear the stops and that the crank clears the stool.
Maybe you need a pro to help with this one?

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HomeSealed
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Re: Replacing windows in brick

#20 Post by HomeSealed » Sat Nov 05, 2011 11:04 am

I'd defer to anthony on this since he has obviously done this before (my experience with Andersen is very limited as I mentioned). If you don't believe him, give Andersen a call to see if: 1) you can get that window without the jamb extensions, and 2) what the jamb depth will then be (should be 3 1/4").... If that is the case, there you have your insert casement. :D

TheWindowNerd
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Re: Replacing windows in brick

#21 Post by TheWindowNerd » Sun Dec 18, 2011 5:47 am

Not only can you get the AW casement window without jamb extension and it is ~ 4" frame thickness, you can use a Pella Proline, Architect or Designer series casement with no jamb extension which gives you a 5" frame thickness, cut off the exterior storm window stops of the original frame and pull the new unit from the outside in and it will not be proud of the brick moulding. Sometimes pella may refer to this as a pfit type install.

masterext
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Re: Replacing windows in brick

#22 Post by masterext » Sun Dec 18, 2011 7:50 am

Ernie
That company sounds like scam...we're you sued in the past by a bunch of customers?
Usually when a company spams like you just did, the websites will aveva virus and it suckers customers into giving credit card numbers...

pmichaud
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Re: Replacing windows in brick

#23 Post by pmichaud » Sun Dec 18, 2011 8:46 am

My wife and I are going to replace our windows in our home which was built in 1973, we live on the Gulf coast and are concerned as to which product to use. We have been looking at American Craftsman but have not found any reviews in this web sight about them, also Pella windows are being considered, I am looking for some honest advice as to which route would be best, also I have a local contractor who says he would install Simonton window, all these would be vinyl windows. We live in a hurricain prone area and consumer reports rates the Pella poorly for wind bet the rep from Lowes tells me that due to our area this is not a problem due to standards set by Texas windstorm guidelines. Need some honest advice because this is a huge decision for us and would like to fell confident in our investment.

EcoStar Remodeling
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Re: Replacing windows in brick

#24 Post by EcoStar Remodeling » Sun Dec 18, 2011 9:06 am

O.K. here's some honest advice. Stop looking for a quality windows in the hardware stores. With the exception of the Simonton 6500 from HD, quality in hardware stores doesn't exist. Second bit of advice is to toss the C.R. in the trash. They only rate products that can be purchased off the shelf at stores like Orange and Blue and completely ignore 99% of the windows available to consumers. hardware stores are fine for purchasing certain products. They are not good places to find quality windows or to get a quality install.

Now, try and contact a local window dealer. Some of the brands the Pro's on here agree are quality windows are made by Sunrise, Softlite, Okna and Gorell. If you can locate a dealer by Googling those brands, do so. If not, contact the manufacturers and get them to help put you in touch with one of their dealers.

BTW, we just removed 17 American Craftsman windows on Friday that were about 2 years old. The reason is they leaked cold air so badly that the customer couldn't stand it anymore. Even though they came with a lifetime warranty, the manufacturer (Silverline/Andersen) couldn't find anything wrong with them that was a "manufacturing defect" which is all their warranty covers. The homeowner was told that there was nothing wrong with their windows.

masterext
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Re: Replacing windows in brick

#25 Post by masterext » Sun Dec 18, 2011 10:34 am

Ecostar's story is all too common. Homeowners try to save a few bucks and go with a low quality window like American craftsman/ silver line or pella vinyl. These products are made for rental properties and customers looking for the cheapest products. As Ecostar just mentioned, he replaced American craftsman windows that were only two years old so they really didn't save any money did they? .they are essentially doing the job twice and it's now a very expensive install. Cheaper is always more expensive when it comes to building materials.

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Windows on Washington
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Re: Replacing windows in brick

#26 Post by Windows on Washington » Sun Dec 18, 2011 3:35 pm

pmichaud wrote:My wife and I are going to replace our windows in our home which was built in 1973, we live on the Gulf coast and are concerned as to which product to use. We have been looking at American Craftsman but have not found any reviews in this web sight about them, also Pella windows are being considered, I am looking for some honest advice as to which route would be best, also I have a local contractor who says he would install Simonton window, all these would be vinyl windows. We live in a hurricain prone area and consumer reports rates the Pella poorly for wind bet the rep from Lowes tells me that due to our area this is not a problem due to standards set by Texas windstorm guidelines. Need some honest advice because this is a huge decision for us and would like to fell confident in our investment.
One recommendation for anyone on the Gulf Coast....randy.

randy is one of the contributing posters to this board and he knows his craft, product choices, and the technology backwards and forwards. He is a honest man and his products are completely superior in every capacity to what you have already seen.

You can find him here and click on his name to get in contact with him.

viewtopic.php?f=1&t=4740

TheWindowNerd
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Re: Replacing windows in brick

#27 Post by TheWindowNerd » Mon Dec 19, 2011 8:04 am

+1 to Randy.

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